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Stephen Ibbott

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Stephen Ibbott graduated in 2001 with an MFA from the University of Guelph (Canada). Since then he has exhibited his work widely in gallery exhibitions and Art Fairs. His work has been reviewed by the New York Times, Toronto Star, Canadian Art among others. He has also won many awards including the “Arts 2000″ National Prize for the Visual Arts and a 2012 Ontario Arts Council Grant.

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Joseph Parra

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” There is an innate desire to replicate an individual through artistic production. Traditionally, as an artist works to render the human figure in any medium, they come to face specific requirements that can often be constraining. For the figure to become more than a combination of forms, one must dive deeper and reveal something that is otherwise unseen. In challenging conventional portraiture, I expel the physical features of an appropriated individual and expose layers to reflect the varied constructs of what it is to be human. These layers can be abstracted, acting as reminders that we are merely a union of ideas. Exposure and concealment are my tools, carried out via printmaking, digital printing, drawing, and painting. Sanding techniques also come into play, to reveal an image beneath multiple opaque and transparent layers or to rid the figure of its physical information altogether, obscuring identity. There are no signifiers to time or place, yielding greater emphasis on the figure. In my charcoal drawings more anatomically correct layering of bodily interior is included as well as moments of landscape, textures, mark making, and cellular structures. This generates a push and pull as the abstract marks create the figure while also diffusing it into abstraction.” – There is an innate desire to replicate an individual through artistic production. Traditionally, as an artist works to render the human figure in any medium, they come to face specific requirements that can often be constraining. For the figure to become more than a combination of forms, one must dive deeper and reveal something that is otherwise unseen. In challenging conventional portraiture, I expel the physical features of an appropriated individual and expose layers to reflect the varied constructs of what it is to be human. These layers can be abstracted, acting as reminders that we are merely a union of ideas. Exposure and concealment are my tools, carried out via printmaking, digital printing, drawing, and painting. Sanding techniques also come into play, to reveal an image beneath multiple opaque and transparent layers or to rid the figure of its physical information altogether, obscuring identity. There are no signifiers to time or place, yielding greater emphasis on the figure. In my charcoal drawings more anatomically correct layering of bodily interior is included as well as moments of landscape, textures, mark making, and cellular structures. This generates a push and pull as the abstract marks create the figure while also diffusing it into abstraction.” – Joseph Parra

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Anita Kunz

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” I’ve been illustrating for international clients for over 30 years. I’ve done numerous magazine covers (The New Yorker, Time, Rolling Stone, The NY Times) and book jackets, as well as many artworks for advertising agencies. I’ve received many awards including the Order of Canada (Canada’s highest civilian honor), and a Lifetime Achievement award from the Advertising and Design Club of Canada and my works are in permanent collections of Museums and galleries world wide.” – Anita Kunz

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Titti Garelli

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Titti Garelli was born in Turin, where she lives and works. For over twenty years her pictures have been requested by the publishing world and by major international advertising agencies.

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Anders Krisár

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Works by Swedish artist/photographer Anders Krisár (1973). Anders is born and raised in Stockholm. He went to the School of Communication Arts in London and studied Music in NYU.

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Jon Shireman

Jon Shireman (previously blogged) is a New York City photographer specializing in still life, travel, architecture, and portrait photography.

Philippe Parreno

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Philippe Parreno is a French artist and filmmaker who lives and works in Paris, France. Parreno regularly exhibits internationally. His work is included in the collections of many institutions such as the Centre Georges Pompidou, France; 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa, Japan; the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), New York; the Walker Art Center (USA); Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, France; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, USA; the Guggenheim Museum New York, USA; and Tate Modern, London.

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Nelson Gutierrez

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Nelson Gutierrez <-- Born in Bogota, Colombia, lives and works in Washington, DC, USA. Since the early 1990s, Nelson Gutierrez's has focused on creating two and three-dimensional artworks, conceptual objects and installations, based on current sociopolitical issues. Through art he looks to better understand societal conflict and its implications psychologically and socially. His art addresses issues of longing, fear, grief and vanity. he juxtaposes materials such as charcoal, ink, wood, metal, blood, wax, water, glass, light and photographs that together also have symbolic relevance to the issue he is exploring. He uses a variety of different mediums to express these feelings and tell a story that is universally understood to us all but experienced more intensely by a select few.

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Shinichi Maruyama

” I tried to capture the beauty of both the human body’s figure and its motion. The figure in the image, which is formed into something similar to a sculpture, is created by combining 10,000 individual photographs of a dancer. By putting together uninterrupted individual moments, the resulting image as a whole will appear to be something different from what actually exists. With regard to these two viewpoints, a connection can be made to a human being’s perception of presence in life.” – Shinichi Maruyama

Franz Architekten

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From the architect. The musical society of zwettl was founded in the year 1887. Its hitherto existing rehearsal space in the attic storey of the municipal office did neither answer to the musical society’s supraregional importance, nor to acoustic requirements. Transferring the music society frees space in the existing building for the increasing number of administration tasks. The new building’s positioning frames the hitherto undefined place and presents an effective enhancement of the municipality’s entrance situation. Moreover, it offers the possibility for concerts of the musical society right next to the rehearsal space. With its contemporary, reduced cubical style the new building forms an intentional counterpoint to the adjacent municipality. For illumination of the ground floor, the structure floats on a circumferential window belt. The façade design with gold-coloured diamond-shaped aluminium composite panels was derived from brass instruments and the pattern of the musical society’s uniforms. By providing a new building for its musical society, the municipality of zwettl signals the society’s importance not only for the town itself, but also beyond. Link.

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