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Steve Haslip

p p p " I'm most productive in the morning " was constructed out of approximately 5000 hand cut matchsticks, a lot of patience, and even more superglue. It was created during my first semester class at SVA with Stefan Sagmeister. We were given the task of illustrating a personal life lesson in the spirit of Stefan's "Things that I have learned in my life so far" projects, which recently became a book. This project took hundreds of hours to complete and was extremely labor intensive but a lot of fun to photograph. Steve Haslip. p

Valery Koroshilov

" My paintings are about my admiration of beauty, joy, happiness and hope. They develop one’s poetic and mystical ambitions. It is aesthetic experience, pleasing the mind and engaging the imagination. "- Valery Koroshilov p

Jeremy Davis

p p Jeremy Davis currently teaches life drawing, sculpture, mold-making, and casting at LymeAcademy. His work can be found in private collections around the country and has been shown publicly in New York, Boston, South Carolina, and Connecticut, where his sculptures are currently on display in both the Madison and Middletown Sculpture Miles. View more of his work here. p p

Phil Hansen

p Artist Phil Hansen paints the Mona Lisa using burger grease for a fast food company who wanted to show how much fat was in their competitor's food. p

The Bread Art Project

p p The Bread Art Project was created by the Grain Foods Foundation to help increase awareness of the growing hunger problem in the United States. Consumers can take part in the Bread Art Project and create a personalized piece of bread art by uploading a favorite drawing or photo, or create a new one using a slice of bread as the canvas. For each piece of bread art created, the Grain Foods Foundation will donate $1 to Feeding America, up to $50,000. One dollar provides seven meals or four bags of groceries to the 25 million people served by food banks annually. The more bread art consumers create, the more meals Feeding America can put on the table for families across the country. p p

Pamela Michelle Johnson

Pamela Michelle Johnson's statement: " Teetering towers of hamburgers, drippy stacks of syrupy waffles, sticky piles of sugary candy... Junk food. It's the taste of America. It is what we eat. It is who we are. The insatiable American appetite is set on a path of consumption. Devouring to the point where we are left with nothing, nothing but the consequential garbage. Quintessentially American, junk food is not just part of our diet, it epitomizes our cultural ideals and social norms. Through my work, I strive to invoke reflection on a culture focused on mass-consumption and mass-production, where the negative aspects of overindulgence are often forgotten or ignored. The work questions a culture that equates fulfillment, pleasure and happiness with what we consume. " ( Read on..) p

Bacone

Bacone is a bacon cone filled with scrambled eggs and country gravy topped with a biscuit. Mmmmmm... mmmmmm. Hehe. Have a happy weekend, everyone! I'll see you all back here on Monday! Kiss.

Edie Nadelhaft

p p I love Edie Nadelhaft's Cherry Biters series. Read on.. " The Cherry Biters are a celebration of paint and painting: a fervent physical expression, and the profound sensual and emotional potency of the substance itself. Derived from photographs of myself, the images are intentionally ambiguous. The biter is captured in mid-chomp, teeth tearing at the fleshy fruit, suspended in a macabre state of pre-demolition. The cherry, half-chewed is often unidentifiable. It could as easily be a hunk of meat or a shiny piece of hard candy. The pictures are decadent, and unabashedly sexual, but my interest is in an impulse more inclusive than lust. These works address the essence of sensual experience, the turbulence of physical existence, in all it's beauty and violence. There is a symbiotic relationship between the literal subject matter: cherry biters, and the means of representation: oil painting. The voluptuousness of the medium is underscored by the sensuality of the chewing, tasting, dripping, juicy images, which are in turn reinforced by the vivid fleshy colors and liberally applied paint. As the work progresses, my perspective evolves from close to extreme close-up resulting in large renderings of tiny things that are no less complex than that which yielded them up as mere details initially. As my vantage point changes, I am able to get lost in the details. My source image is isolated from context and/or magnified to such a degree that I can no longer perceive it's objective meaning, rendering from such a close perspective that it appears to me as a total abstraction. " p

Lorraine Clarke

p Lorraine Clarke <-- Born Doncaster, Yorkshire. Currently living and working in London; Visual artist, co-founder and art director of Euroart Studios and Gallery, Tottenham, London. p

Christopher Cousins

p " I felt like I was working something out with each new painting…. Even now I never know exactly where a new work will take me. There is no map, no guide, only instinct and, one hopes, intellect to lead me. " - Christopher Cousins