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Katerina Jebb

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‘ Much has already been written on the relationship between death and photography, on reality and fiction, on the blurring of genres-all fundamental themes in the discussion around contemporary photographers and the work of Katerina Jebb. Using a variety of techniques- scanners, photocopy machines and conventional cameras- Jebb almost denatures life, capturing the familiar and re-presenting it to us as something alien and otherwordly. As with the daguerreotype, Jebb’s images feel like a dim and fading memory which momentarily saves the sitter from inexorable destruction in the form of the photographic trace. ‘ (via Fred and Associates)

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Orna Bromberg

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Orna Bromberg <-- Born 1955 in Tel Aviv; Lives and works in Israel; Certified educator from the Israel Ministry of Education (1998)

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Heather McClintock

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‘ Raised on a dairy farm in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont, Heather McClintock received her B.A. from New England College in N.H. and England, and then relocated to NYC to pursue her personal journey through prestigious commercial studios. Seeking a deeper, more intimate connection to humanity and the commonalities of our existence, Ms. McClintock’s passion for recording the essence and purity of the human condition came to fruition in northern Uganda, where it awoke a longing to document the strength of will, hope and grace within each of us.

Her Uganda work has garnered several awards and recognition, including most recently being selected for the prestigious Eddie Adam’s Barnstorm XXI Workshop, awarded an artist’s sponsorship by Blue Earth Alliance for ” The Innocent: Casualities of the Civil War in Northern Uganda” project; Merit of Excellence and Honorable Mention in the 2007 International Color Awards Photography Master’s Cup; the 2006 Center for Photographic Art Artists Project Award; the 2008 and 2006 Photo Review International; First Prize and Honorable Mention in photojournalism in the Black & White Spider Awards. her work has been exhibited internationally and is included in the collection of the Santa Barbara Museum of Art and several private collections. ‘

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Paul Martus

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American designer Paul Martus creates furniture and products and unique metal works. Check it out.

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Thom Kerr

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” In early 2005, Thom Kerr whilst studying fine arts, initiated a collective called Rufio Creative. Working mostly as director and producer, Thom began working on multiple portrait and fashion shoots. Upon completion of his film degree, he ventured into the realm of photography. His work was quickly embraced by the Australian and New Zealand fashion scene and he now contributes to some of the southern hemisphere’s best publications. He continues to make short films with Rufio Creative, and also freelances as a writer and designer. ”

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Adrian Riemann

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German designer Adrian Riemann has spent the last few months illustrating 16 redesigns of famous Masters of the Universe characters. See the rest of them here.

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Mel Marcelo

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Check out the illustrations of San Diego-based artist Mel Marcelo. Looks goodness.

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Zhong Biao

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‘ As a sensitive artist, Zhong Biao has captured the pulse of China’s social reforms through the visual symbols Chinese people are familiar with. He takes the visual experiences of an era as the image source of his works, including sculpture and china representing China’s past glories, the labor models of the Cultural Revolution, and such symbols of modern life as McDonalds and Boeing aircrafts. Of course, most symbols are skyscrapers and western-style buildings in old China. What attracts artists is the different meanings of these images, because in the language of ordinary Chinese people, what used to be synonymous with corrupt capitalist society or colonization is now the symbol of modernity. With the development of movies, TV, printing, and digital technology, it seems that the way modern man receives information has already undergone the transition from text to images. In these new circumstances, images from different eras are frequently taken out of their original context and used repeatedly. And in this process they are continuously endowed with new cultural meanings. Zhong Biao’s work is similar to the “knowledge archeology” described by Facult Michael. In “visual archeology” similar to “knowledge archeology,” he cuts a section from the visual symbols people are familiar with, then takes out those fragmented symbols from the cultural deposits of different times, and last arranges and combines them in a unique way. What he wants is not to show the meaning of symbols themselves, but to reveal the changing meanings of the images through setting up peculiar scenes. ‘ (via Art Scene Warehouse)

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Hu Ke

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‘ Chinese contemporary sculpture artist Hu Ke creates works of a young female displayed in compromising situations. Despite the actions and positions Hu-Ke sculpts the figure in, she appears to have a disturbing calm written on her face. ‘ (via Designboom)

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Miriam Moshinsky

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Miriam Moshinsky <-- born in Russia at 1978; lives and works in Israel;
graduated from Avni Institute specializing in Graphic Design and Digital Art.

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