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Sweet Station in France!

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Photos sent by Jessica Guez aka Subtile Incoherence from Garges les Gonesse, France. More to come soon.

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James White

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James White is a talented mixed-media artist and graphic designer with an incredible portfolio and featured in Computer Arts and Advanced Photoshop magazines. He started drawing his favorite characters at the age of 4 and in 1995 he took the Graphic Design course at a community college in Truro, Nova Scotia.He started working in 1998 in the website/graphic design area and in his free time he created logos, flyers, posters, CD covers and websites for various local music and entertainment companies.”

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Matt Johnson

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Matt Johnson’s sculptures delightfully explore the paradox of visual forms through unorthodox and surprising materials. The Pianist (After Robert J. Lang) pays tribute to the American physicist and master origami artist who has astounded with his mathematically complex objects crafted from creased paper. Rendered life-sized, Johnson’s giant origami masterpiece is made from one 50 foot piece of tarp folded into the shape of a concern piano and player, humorously honouring genius with floppy monumentality. Johnson’s choice of blue wrapping is a clever reference to Yves Klein whose signature International Klein Blue (also a scientific marvel) is synonymous with sublimation and glamour theatrically elevating his wonky musician to iconic design status. ‘

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Souther Salazar

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Souther Salazar’s work first began to circulate in the early 90′s, in the form of photocopied cut-and-paste microcomics and ‘zines made in his bedroom as a young teenager in rural Oakdale, CA. After graduating from Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, CA, he moved to Los Angeles. Souther Salazar exhibits his collages, paintings, drawings and sculptures in dense and frenzied installations that encourage exploration and participation by the viewer. His work has appeared in galleries in New York, Los Angeles, Portland and Tokyo, and in publications such as Kramers Ergot, Swindle and The Drama and a recent cover feature in Giant Robot. ‘ (via Jonathan LeVine Gallery)

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Ujin Lee

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A very unique collaboration project led by Ujin Lee and Tom Edwards entitled Dust, taking what’s normal in the environment and adding in random elements, thereby altering the entire scenery.

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Johanna Basford

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” I’m a creative catch-all; a designer, illustrator, printer on a mission to cover the world with my hand drawn patterns and motifs. I’m not a Vector Technician, but one of the dwindling number of creatives who still likes to put pen to paper. My work is underpinned by a love for the ornate, a ‘paint not pixels’ approach and my Free-Range upbringing on a rural Scottish Fish Farm. ” – Johanna Basford (Thank you for the link Nikki P.)

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Steve Lambert

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Everything You Want, Right Now! by Steve Lambert at the Charlie James Gallery in Los Angeles. Have a look.

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Claire Scully

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Intricate animal pattern art by Claire Scully.

“Inspiration for my self initiated work often comes from my everyday surroundings of the metropolis and its relationship with the natural world. I love 50’s, 60’s and 70’s architecture particularly tower blocks with their form and location, this is where I also find the connection to nature and natural patterns in the environment of interest.”

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Patipat Asavasena

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Amazing work by Patipat Asavasena, who has a Bachelor degree in Mechanical Engineering at Kasetsart University, Thailand. He is currently working in an animation studio called The Monk studio.

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Alright Rocking Chair

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” This personal project is a low rise chair that reflects both my Japanese and Danish ancestry. This piece is truly engineering simplified into beauty. The bent plywood construction not only provides comfortable, ergonomic seating, but is also bent in a manner to strength the product in areas where much force is put onto the joinery. A subtle arc instead of traditional legs provide one of the most structural methods of transferring weight to the ground. A rubber mount provides a pivot point and allows freedom of movement, further increasing comfort. ” – Joseph Riehl

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