homepage

Savannah Coasters

 photo Savannah-Coasters6_zps78e7197b.jpg

 photo Savannah-Coasters3_zps6dab12cf.jpg

‘Create beautiful scenery on your dining table with these coasters each featuring an animal. Use them individually or place one on another to create a full scene around a glass.’ Link here.

 photo Savannah-Coasters_zps95772406.jpg

Hernan Bas

 photo HB_LM12339_The_Burden_I_Shall_Leave_No_Memoirs_hr2_zps99101a92.jpg

 photo LE-RAGIONI-DELLA-PITTURA-ESITI-E-PROSPETTIVE-DI-UN-MEDIUM-Hernan-Bas-A-green-line-2005-foto-Gino-Di-Paolo_zps5ca0eea4.jpg

Detroit-based artist Hernan Bas (b. 1978, Miami, Florida) explores the codes of dandyism and its subculture as a means to define sexual attraction. His paintings are tinged with nihilist romanticism, born of literary intrigue and a passion for historical painting. Intricate, frail, and sensuously delightful, Bas’s paintings personify epic romance embracing both the decadence and nastiness of pleasure. His works have been exhibited in numerous solo and group exhibitions, among them the 2012 retrospective at the Kunstverein Hannover, Germany; the 2007 retrospective at the Rubell Family Collection, Miami, which presented a decade of the artist’s work and traveled to the Brooklyn Museum of Art in February 2008; and his inclusion in the Nordic Pavilion at the 53rd Venice Biennale, curated by Elmgreen & Dragset. The artist has been included in recent group exhibitions including Contemporary Magic: A Tarot Deck Art Project at the Andy Warhol Museum, and The Cry at the Museo de Arte Contemporaneo de Castilla y Leon (MUSAC). In March 2012, Bas had his second solo exhibition at Lehmann Maupin. The artist lives and works in Detroit, Michigan.

 photo HB_LM11382_Stuffed_hr2_zps6f2ed880.jpg

 photo BasforBlog1_zpsa9aa8ab2.jpg

Morgan Herrin

 photo 4162831_orig_zps57ae0a57.jpg

 photo herrin-7_zps88930a3a.jpg

” The evidence of my labor gives value to the material, which is otherwise cheap and disposable. Recycled, construction-grade lumber reflects our society’s preference for cheap, fast, and impermanent. My sculptures are hand-carved, a process that takes hundreds of work-hours and utilizes hand tools that have been almost completely phased out by modern machines. These two aspects combine to create a dialogue about time and the contrast between the past and the present. I immerse myself in the subject matter of my work. Often, several very different forms combine to create one physical object. My process is ultimately a result of the combination of my fascination with figurative sculpture of the past and obsessive research into a subject. I reference the passage of time and its effect on art in terms of both physical change and change in viewer perception. ” – Morgan Herrin

 photo Morgan_Herrin_1_ada_galleryL_zpsca5940fc.jpg

 photo Morgan_Herrin_ada_gallery_GBlog_2_zpsfd6f325b.jpg

 photo 03fd8804e062b041f0609d6067c8c678_zps7ae1f052.jpg

Peter Stichbury

 photo HaroldChild_Stichbury_zps8bf07ca6.jpg

 photo AmandaSteckFuhrman_stichbury_zps4e63b8ab.jpg

 photo BarnabyPan2012_Stichbury_zpscc876433.jpg

Peter Stichbury’s ‘portraits of wide-eyed, flawlessly polished, and sharply dressed figures are both captivating and uncanny. Stichbury employs a cool color palette—icy grey for the eyes, mannequin-cream for the skin—expelling all traces of human warmth or internal, emotional activity.’

 photo Estelle10_Stichburycopy_zps00c22a4f.jpg

 photo GlennFuhrman_stichbury_zps21b7d2e4.jpg

Kenneth Steinbach

 photo tumblr_mvkn1dbDKY1sykrb6o3_1280_zpsd6f8f13f.jpg

 photo tumblr_mvkn1dbDKY1sykrb6o2_1280_zps215f7bdf.jpg

Kenneth Steinbach is an artist who uses a variety of media and approaches, but works principally in sculpture. Recent exhibits include The New Forests of Thoreau’s America at the College of Visual Arts in St. Paul, and Still There at the Gallery at Fox Tax in Minneapolis. He has shown throughout the United States, including exhibits at the Phillip Slein Gallery in St. Louis, and Koplin Del Rio Gallery in Los Angeles, and Circa Gallery in Minneapolis who has represented his work for the past seven years.’ (via Local Artist Interviews)

 photo tumblr_mvkn1dbDKY1sykrb6o1_1280_zpsb021611a.jpg

Cristina Penescu

 photo focused_by_cristinapenescu-d4p4mm3_zps150c9fe7.jpg

 photo 0_79694_54573c38_XL_zpsd2369d03.jpg

 photo Cristina_Penescu_artwork_6_zpsfefc162d.jpg

Cristina Penescu was born in Bucharest, Romania, 1988. Her family relocated to California when Cristina was a year old. Since early childhood, her passion for art and nature was very apparent. As a child she loved to collect books about animals and spend her time outside in nature. Cristina has experimented with a variety of mediums and styles and recently has made the transition to realistic wildlife art, which she feels has always been her true calling in life. She enjoys painting a wide variety of wildlife subjects, however wild canids, especially wolves, hold a special place in her heart and have been a recurring theme in her art since childhood. Cristina is has had no formal training and is a self-educated artist. She has experience working in a variety of mediums, however she prefers acrylic and scratchboard. Her artwork is very detail oriented and she aims to bring the viewer an up close, intimate look at nature. She hopes to inspire the world through her depictions of the natural beauty around us. Cristina is currently at the beginning of her career as a wildlife fine artist but has already begun to carve a niche for herself in the field. She recently was accepted as a Signature Member of the world-renowned Society of Animal Artists. Cristina is also a member of Artists for Conservation and the Marwell International Wildlife Art Society.

 photo Curious_Observation_by_CristinaPenescu_zpsa2f1e7b4.jpg

 photo hunger_crisis_by_cristinapenescu-d46bmxa_zps594a4da2.jpg

Betty Woodman

 photo BETTYFREEMANS6_585_500_zpse439dcb3.jpeg

 photo polka_dot-sideA_copy_332_500_zps04ad6304.jpg

Betty Woodman (American, born in Norwalk, Connecticut, 1930 — ) is an American artist. Internationally recognized[citation needed] as one of today’s most important sculptors using ceramics, Betty Woodman’s career began in the 1950s as a production potter with the aim of creating objects to enhance everyday life. Since then, the vase has become Woodman’s subject, product, and muse. In deconstructing and reconstructing its form, she has created an exuberant and complex body of sculpture. Its signature is its reflection of a wide range of influences and traditions and an inventive use of color. As she has written, “The centrality of the vase in my work certainly implies a global perspective on art history and production. The container is a symbol — it holds and pours all fluids, stores food and contains everything from flowers to our final remains.” Many of these traditions Woodman has experienced first-hand as she has traveled extensively, finding inspiration in cultures around the world. As recently described by American Ceramics magazine “The dramatic and luminous effect of glazes attracted Woodman to ceramics, leading her to study at the School for American Craftsmen at Alfred University. She further developed her passion for clay when she moved to Italy, falling in love with Mediterranean art, a consequential influence for her work. Having a background in ceramics, it is easy to peg Betty Woodman as a craftsperson. However, upon taking a closer look, Woodman is hardly just that. She is an artist whose work hovers above the line of art and craft, drawing its power from both.

 photo polka_dot-side_B_460_700_zps4f6ea680.jpg

 photo BETTYFREEMANS4_620_413_zps8cd0be01.jpeg

Sylvie Fleury

 photo June_July_August_SF_38_620_388_zpsa4f7d6c5.jpg

 photo It_Might_As_Well_Rain_Until_September_SF_29_620_388_zpsd26351be.jpg

 photo Sophisticated_Boom_Boom_SF_37_620_388_zpsc6e4075b.jpg

Sylvie Fleury is a Swiss contemporary pop artist employing sculpture, mixed media. Her work addresses the issues of shopping, and the paradigm of the new age. Born 1961, Geneva. Critics have labeled her work “post-appropriationist,” and her books The art of survival, First Spaceship on Venus and Other Vehicles, and Parkett #58 (with Jason Rhoades and James Rosenquist), have been featured internationally.

 photo Later_Later_SF_30_620_388_zps612b37c8.jpg

 photo Everybody_Loves_Saturday_Night_SF_28_620_386_zpsb5caa44c.jpg

Paula Hayes

 photo GiantTer_SG09_GT02_3_900_1114_80_zpsfbb28f1b.jpg

 photo GiantTer_SG09_GT02_1_900_1125_80_zps155655a6.jpg

 photo GiantTer_SG09_GT02_5_900_1116_80_zps5256fb0d.jpg

New York-based landscape designer and artist Paula Hayes works with plant life and minerals to produce stunning terrariums as sculptures for gallery environments. Hayes’s work crafts industrial materials—such as hand-blown glass, silicone, or cast acrylic—into organic shapes that she then fills with a rich variety of plant life. These works deftly combine the intricate beauty and care required of the plant life with innovative, willfully independent sculptural forms. Paula Hayes was born 1958 in Concord, Massachusetts. (via Salon94)

 photo Giants_SG09_GT6_GT16_5_900_1260_80_zps9514404a.jpg

 photo Giants_SG09_GT6_GT16_JGR1_1_900_1300_80_zpsd90e770b.jpg

Oliver Jeffers

 photo without-a-doubt-pt1_zpsfaa4efe1.jpg

 photo without-a-doubt-pt2_zpsf7e098d3.jpg

Oliver Jeffers makes art. From figurative painting and installation to illustration and picture-book making, Jeffers work takes many forms. His distinctive paintings have been exhibited in multiple cities, including the National Portrait Gallery in London, the Brooklyn Museum, Lazarides Gallery and Gestalten Space, Berlin.

 photo without-a-doubt-pt3_zpsb518b560.jpg