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Sign Language Alphabet Key Chain

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‘ Fwingers are the most unique initial key chains ever made. These colorful, 3-D, cartoon-like hands are available in the each letter of the American Sign Language alphabet. Approximately 2″ tall x 1″ wide and available in five colors, Fwingers let you sign your initials to the world. For every Fwinger key chain purchased online, Small Marvel will donate $1 to a deaf school or organization of your choice. We have a lofty goal of donating $1 million over the next year, so be sure to find your initials, one for your friends, or just buy an “I Love You” for everybody you know. Find your initial key chain in Sign Langauge! ‘ (via Kaboodle)

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Daniel Bruson

Please check it out Brazilian graphic artist and freelance designer Daniel Bruson. There’s plenty more fabulous stuff to see on his website so, go.

Walton Creel

” When I decided I wanted to make art using a gun, I was not sure what direction I would have to take. I knew I did not want to use it simply as an accent to work I was doing, but as the focus. My main goal was to take the destructive power away from the gun. To manipulate the gun into a tool of creation and use it in a way that removed it from its original purpose, to deweaponize it. During my first experiment I came across the concept of creating an image hole by hole on a surface. I also figured out that canvas would be too stressed by the process of a rifle firing many bullets into it. I moved on to aluminum and, with further experimentation, I figured out exactly how far apart my shots needed to be and that moving beyond .22 caliber was simply too destructive. When the aluminum was painted beforehand, the blast of the gun knocked off a tiny amount of paint around each hole, which helped fuse the image together. ” – Walton Creel

Rub-A-Dub Tub Soap Dish

You’ll feel squeaky clean when you use this miniature tub soap dish with tiny faucets! Use it in the kitchen or bathroom for an extra flare of design when washing dishes, hands, or yourself or get creative and use in your bedroom to hold stud earrings, change from your coat pockets, or your cell phone when you sleep! So many sud-able options! Link here.

Laura Bifano

” I was born and raised on the very damp Vancouver island and moved to Calgary in 2004 where I attended the Alberta College of Art and Design. Upon receiving my Bachelor of Design, I began working as a freelance Illustrator. I am currently residing in Victoria, British Columbia. ” – Laura Bifano

Scott Fife

” I like the physical nature of building the sculpture–it seems very old-fashioned and traditional. The idea of the material itself–it’s friendly, flexible, there’s a glow from in it. I’m the full-service artist–doing it all at the moment. I like the aspect of the low-tech tools that I need to make something like this. In the beginning [it was] an Xacto knife, masking tape and glue–now it’s the screwgun. So that hasn’t changed much at all–the directness of it, that I could begin to shape this, I can make this very plastic without any special process. There is that sense of one person building this thing–it becomes a “feat”–the whole thing isn’t about that but within the world we live in right now, it makes it a kind of tribal ritual piece; the fact that it was done by the human hand. [That] takes people back to the place in their life where they remember pasting things together [and so] understanding the process.” – Scott Fife (previously-blogged)

David Schutter

David Schutter <-- Born 1974 (Wilkes-Barre, PA); 2003 - MFA, The University of Chicago, 1996 - Certificate, The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts; Lives and works in Chicago

John Curtin School of Medical Research

John Curtin School of Medical Research (Australian National University) designed by Lyons.

Zeng Fanzhi

Zeng Fanzhi was born in 1964, and came of age during the Chinese Cultural Revolution. He studied at the Hubei Academy of Fine Arts in his province, where he was deeply influenced by Expressionism. From his graduate work on, Fanzhi’s paintings have reflected these cultural and critical touchstones, from his breakthrough “Mask” series, featuring Chinese youths wearing the traditional bandanas of the Red Guard, to portraits of Communist figureheads such as Marx and Chairman Mao, to his recent abstract landscapes filled with intense brushstrokes and primary colors. Since 1993, Fanzhi has lived and worked in Beijing. He has exhibited widely at acclaimed institutions such as the Shanghai Art Museum, National Art Museum (Beijing), Kunst Museum Bonn, Kunstmuseum Bern, Santa Monica Art Centre (Barcelona), and Art Centre (Hong Kong). (via Aquavella Galleries)

Ron Mueck

A plucked ostrich-sized chicken hangs by its feet in Still Life by Ronald “Ron” Mueck (born 1958), an Australian hyperrealist sculptor working in the United Kingdom. (Photos via Art Blart)