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Unhappily Ever After

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Unhappily Ever After‘ by New York City-based artist Jeff Hong. Love this.

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Mini Briefcase Business Card Case

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Mini Briefcase Business Card Case ‘hold a good stack of your business cards for your next big meeting, conference, or convention. If you’re a grifter, you can even carry a few cards from each of your aliases. Made of aluminum, this case will block RFID scanning if you’d like to store a credit card inside, too.’

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Jeong Woojae

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Jeong Woojae was born in Korea in 1983. He has a BA in Fine Art at Chugye University and an MA in Fine Art from Hong-Ik University. Jeong’s paintings are charming and playful expressions of the bond between humans and their animals. At first glance, they might appear to be a straightforward celebration of their animal subject, yet the works go beyond mere realism – a spell Jeong is keen to shatter with the playful reversal in the size of his figures. For Jeong, each ingredient in his composition has a symbolic resonance; his animal compositions are the vocabulary through which he addresses a particular contemporary malaise. Concerned by the increasingly unfeeling nature of our fast-paced society, Jeong maintains that humanity needs to rekindle our former nature and embrace a kind of purity of state – something that continues to exist in our animals. Link here.

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Mark Bryan

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As a child of the Fifties and Sixties, born and raised in Southern California, Bryan could not avoid soaking up the pop culture and angst of that time and place. He was fascinated by cheesy Sci-Fi and horror movies, super hero comics, Mad Magazine, Salvador Dali, The Twilight zone, Zap Comics, etc…….. All of those influences plus the “duck and cover” mentality of the Red Scare had their shots at a sensitive mind. In addition to the constant threat of atomic annihilation, the Civil Rights Movement, Vietnam War, and the Kennedy and King assassinations further provoked a political awareness and a sense that all is not right with the human species. At an early age art became a way for Bryan to deal with and make sense of the world. When the time came to choose an occupation Bryan studied architecture briefly but soon realized art was his best path to free expression. While attending Otis Art Institute in Los Angeles (Master of Fine Arts, 1974), Bryan took up with the early founders of the Chicano Art movement (Los Four). They introduced him to the Mexican Muralists’ work of the early 20th century and the value of a tradition of accessible work with social/political content. This realization combined with his early influences have come together in his work to create a unique and engaging brew. (Continue…)

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Mari Kim

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Mari Kim was born in South Korea in 1979. She studied a Master’s Degree in Creative media, at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, where she lived for ten years. Now based in her hometown of Seoul, Mari Kim works as Professor of BA Digital Media at the Catholic University, South Korea, alongside her art practice. Mari Kim’s wide-eyed, pretty porcelaneous, characters, also known as ‘Eyedolls’, pay service to Japanese manga and anime culture. Often direct representations of well known political and historical figures, super heroes, or fairy tale characters they are instantly recognisable icons, popularised by western media. Mari Kim’s training in animation is understood through her use of bright, bold colours, simplified form and idealised features. With petite mouths and small noses her portraits confront fixed ideas and misogynist expectations of beauty and femininity projected by mainstream media and contemporary culture. The inhumanly large eyes are an obvious focal point in all her portraits. Decorated with Kaleidoscopic patterns, they have an almost hypnotic quality, that offer the viewer an alternative view of the world. They become windows into Mari-Kim’s all-seeing eye where reality and the virtual world are divided. The dolls do not engage with their audience, instead they look through us, distracted by a material culture that afflicts the young and impressionable of East Asia, perhaps more than any other group on the continent. Some clutch onto prized objects or wear cute feminine dress with child-like innocence, soft pinks and hazy yellows in “Marie” or “Kitty1” reinforce this sense of vulnerability. In other works, the ‘Eyedolls’ take on more assertive roles. Masquerading as Margaret Thatcher, “Iron Lady” demonstrates female strength and power, challenging ideological notions of female identity and gender inequality.

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Under My Skin by Winkler+Noah

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‘Skin is almost a poetry. Skin is the ‘box’ of our body. We all have different type of skin, from Extra White to Dark Black. Shooting Skin is a mind work, because you can see the soul of women or men behind the camera. Skin is absolutely private: the eye can found a secret scar, a strange mole, a wonderful curve, or a part of the body that it doesn’t like. ‘ – Winkler+Noah

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Andrea Hasler

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Andrea Hasler was born in Zürich, Switzerland, and currently lives and works in London, UK. She holds an MA Fine Art from Chelsea College of Art & Design.Her wax and mixed media sculptures are characterized by a tension between attraction and repulsion, and highly influenced by artists like John Isaacs, Berlinde De Bruyckere and Louise Bourgeouis. Recent solo projects include ‘Burdens of Excess’ at GUSFORD | los angeles, ‚Irreducible Complexity’ and ‚Full fat or semi-skinned?’ Next Level Projects, London. Hasler’s work was recently exhibited at the 1st Santorini Biennale of Arts in Greece, 2012. Her recent solo exhibition Irreducible Complexity will be featured in the upcoming documentary Snapshots of Shoreditch, looking at the art scene in the East End of London. Hasler also chairs artist talks at Next Level Projects and regularly lectures on contemporary art, with a focus on women artist and the body, at various institutions including the Sotheby’s Institute of Art, London. Most recently, Hasler has won the Greenham Common Commission for 2014 and is currently artist in residency at Chisenhale, London.

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3D Shark Ice Mold

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‘The 3D Shark Ice Mold is really a nice way to get some excitment while doing things you regularly do. These are not just regular ice cubes, they are miniature ice sculptures! The scary shark in your drink is sure to add some excitement. People will love the small sharks moving around in their drinks. It is a great way to surprise visitors to your home for dinner or drinks.’

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Agus Suwage

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One of Indonesia’s most revered and internationally active contemporary artists, Agus Suwage has been featured in approximately 150 museum and gallery exhibitions around the world, and his works are included in most comprehensive collections of Southeast Asian contemporary art.

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Sean Mahan

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This series of paintings by Sean Mahan is part of a larger series of figurative paintings on wood. The paintings are social-realist graphite renderings on oak and birch, colored with thin washes of acrylic. They depict a sense of wonder at the simple inherent sweetness of the human character and its conflict with structures of power and control. In this series, the symbol of the “shadow person” is repeatedly used to pose questions about those “in the shadow of power,” and to pose questions about our insulated view of the impact popular consumer culture has on others.

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